Sohar Port and Freezone records 36% container traffic growth

Sohar Port and Freezone records 36% container traffic growth
Containers traffic rose 36%last year compared to 2016, while dry bulk throughput increased 25%year-on-year.
Published: 30 January 2018 - 1:36 a.m.
By: Rajiv Ravindran Pillai

Sohar Port and Freezone posted a year of consistent growth with an average of over 1-million tonnes of cargo handled by the port every week in 2017.

Containers traffic rose 36% last year compared to 2016, while dry bulk throughput increased 25% year-on-year, according to a statement. 

Mark Geilenkirchen, CEO of Sohar Port and Freezone, said: “We are pleased to report another year of solid growth for Sohar Port and Freezone. In 2017, we focused strongly on the food sector and were able to attract significant public and private sector investments to the cluster. Our focus on this field enabled us to capture a larger slice of the food products cargo trade in the region. 

“This is aided by the steady growth in aggregate cargo volumes and investments at the port, such as the upcoming Sohar Port South expansion, which is set to deliver additional cargo capacity and attract significantly more business.” 

Sohar Port received 3,075 vessel calls in 2017, marking a increase of 17%, despite the continued global trend towards consolidation and larger ships, Times of Oman reported.

One of the major highlights for Sohar Port and Freezone in 2017 was the establishment of a 40-hectare food cluster at the port which will include a major flour mill, a sugar refinery, and a grain silo complex.

The flour mill, operated by Sohar Flour Mills, will have a capacity of 500 tonnes per day, while the planned sugar refinery, owned and operated by the Oman Sugar Refinery Co, will boast a production capacity of 1-million tonnes per annum. Sohar Port now operates a terminal dedicated exclusively for the food cluster.

 

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