DNV GL publishes energy transition framework for cities

DNV GL publishes energy transition framework for cities
Published: 8 March 2018 - 5:54 a.m.
By: Baset Asaba

DNV GL, the world’s largest resource of independent energy experts and certification body, has today published a new report into the activities of cities around the world that are driving the global transition to a sustainable, decarbonized energy future.

The report "Energy Transition Framework for Cities" finds that while megacities attract the headlines, significant innovation and leadership is occuring in mid-size cities, which are more numerous and comprise a greater portion of the world's population in aggregate.

Surveying the activities of ten of the most forward-looking and pioneering cities globally, the report identifies best practices that other cities can use to achieve sustainability and economic development goals, as well as opportunities for partnerships to accelerate the energy transition.

Cities consume about 75% of the world’s primary energy and contribute around 60% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Yet until recently, many municipalities didn’t see energy policy as part of their statutory powers.

However, cities are now becoming significant players in the energy markets and actively accelerating the shift to a cleaner, more efficient and decarbonized energy supply to address increasingly urgent community concerns.

In Energy Transition Framework for Cities, DNV GL examines the policies and initiatives of 10 pioneering cities from the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Australia who are at the vanguard of this transition, assessing these activities in seven key dimensions.

It finds that cities are increasing their staff and resources through the creation of new programmes, partnerships and services focused on energy generation, procurement and use.

While cities have had a great deal of success setting aggressive climate and energy targets and implementing programmes in their own operations, other areas related to financing and resilience remain challenging for them.

“Driven by inconsistent international leadership and enabled by changes in technology, energy markets and regulation, cities have emerged as significant players in the energy transition. But there are some challenges they cannot face alone,” said Richard Barnes, Executive Vice President and Regional Manager, Energy North America at DNV GL.

Although specific strategies and approaches are varied, the Energy Transition Framework described in the report identifies best practices and recommendations for cities to adopt in their own planning processes.


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